Overloading and Falling Materials in Crane Safety

HoistCam Safety

Overloading and Falling Materials in Crane Safety

Crane load overhead

Crane load overhead

As mentioned in a previous article, one of the largest causes of injury and death in crane accidents is the danger of electrocution by overhead power lines. We’ve already shown how cameras on cranes can help with this issue. But what about overloading and falling materials in crane safety. How can HoistCam’s cameras on cranes help to ensure that the crane is not overloaded and that the load is properly secured?

As explained by Spanco, overloading can be a serious problem for crane safety. “According to OSHA, 80 percent of all crane upsets and structural failures can be attributed to exceeding the crane’s operational capacity. When a crane is overloaded, it is subject to structural stresses that may cause irreversible damage. Swinging or sudden dropping of the load, using defective components, hoisting a load beyond capacity, dragging a load and side-loading a boom can all cause overloading.”

OSHA also states that there is one accident for every ten thousand hours of use by a crane. Almost eighty percent of those accidents are said to be caused by human error, when the crane is loaded with more that it can safely lift. Unfortunately, the operator cannot always see the load, as it is often out of his line of sight. HoistCam’s cameras on cranes can help with this problem. By placing cameras in strategic places on the crane, the operator can increase his line of sight to see any part of the lift, including loading. The camera feeds to a monitor which the operator can simply glance at inside the cab. There’s no need for the operator to come down out of the cab to see the load. He can do so right from where he sits.

Not only does giving line of sight to the operator help him ensure that the lift is not overloaded, he can also double check to make sure that the load is secured properly. When a load is not properly secured, there is a huge risk of falling materials causing injuries or even death. Of course, falling materials also cost time and money. Again, with a simple glance at a monitor, the operator can watch as it is being loaded, being careful to note that it is not overloaded. He can then watch to make sure that the load is properly secured as the riggers and spotters are working. This not only saves time and money, but could save lives as well by preventing accidents which occur when a lift is overloaded or not properly secured.